Powered by Blogger.

How to Participate in a Twitter Chat: For Teachers

Hey, y'all!

If you've been following me on social media or this blog for any length of time, you've probably realized that I love to try new things with technology in and out of the classroom in order to impact my teaching practice.

Long before I had a blog, I was very active on Twitter. However, I had never participated in a Twitter chat before I became a teacher! Twitter chats have been an amazing way for me to connect with other educators around the world around specific topics, and I seem to always leave each one feeling more energized than before I started. Because of this, I wanted to bring you:


Twitter chats take place every day of the week around a LOT of different topics in education. Grade specific, subject specific, education hot topic specific...you name it, there is probably a Twitter chat for it.  Don't have a chat to join but want to find one? Check out this longggg list of Twitter chats I found. 


1. Get a Twitter Account. (or Sign In if you already have one)
Tip: If you're just making an account, something that is similar to your name or position will most likely foster more engagement overall, as you will be easier to search.

If you're at www.twitter.com. in the top right corner you will see the options to Log In to Twitter or Sign Up for an account.


2. Find Your Chat.  
Type the chat's hashtag into your search box in the top right corner. For the sake of this example, I typed #JCPSchat, which is a chat my district has.

3. Click "Latest".
Clicking "latest" will have the chats load in the order that people send them so you can just scroll and follow along during the chat. If you check the hashtag when the chat is not happening, you will still see the Tweets appear in order as people use the hashtag.

4. Take note of who is moderating the chat, so you're aware who will be posting the questions (especially if it is a large chat. Tweets start moving fast!)

5. Questions/Answering
For Twitter chats, questions follow a Q1, Q2, Q3 format. When you answer questions, you then should use an A1, A2, A3 format. This allows participants to see what you're referencing and will lead to better conversation.

For example, so you can see the format, this was question 2 in a chat I participated in:



The question has "Q2" to identify it as the 2nd question and answers to that question had "A2" at the beginning to indicate the answer corresponded with question 2.

6. Use the chat's hashtag when tweeting.
Use the chat's hashtag in every tweet so it shows up in the chat's thread. Without it, people in the chat won't see what you're posting!

7. Start responding + engaging with others! 
It is okay, obviously, for you to be a "lurker" the first couple of times, but you will get a LOT more out of the chat by engaging and connecting with others!

It is THAT easy! If you haven't participated in a Twitter chat yet, I highly encourage you to do so! It is like a bite-sized, pocket PD that you can access when you have time! Also, find me on Twitter, I would LOVE to connect!

Happy Tweeting,


Dear Teacher, You are Enough.



Dear Teachers,

It's that time again. You know... the time where you have to either take down your entire classroom or cover every resource with butcher paper, even though there is a month of school left. The time where desks go in rows, countdowns begin, art projects are taken down, flexible seating options are put away and you make sure you have a place to double lock materials and store extra snacks. It's "I can't help you, just do your best" time. It's state testing season.

You've prepared for this the entire year. Even if you don't focus much on "the test" in your classroom and in your school, you've still been preparing for it. You know the standards that will be tested and the kids know (dread) that this happens each year. However, no matter how great of a year you and your students have had or how awesome your classroom culture is this time of year always seems incredibly stressful.

I know you've had the talk with you students about how one test doesn't measure their worth. One test doesn't tell them if they're a good brother, sister, friend. One test doesn't show anyone that they're a really good artist, that they stand up to bullies, or are extremely compassionate. One test does not define their future success in life and a label of "Novice" or "Apprentice" may show us that they aren't there "yet" in terms of learning some standards, but it doesn't mean they are less than. I know you've told them that you're proud of them always, no matter what.  But regardless of how you and your students view testing, it happens, and we must all put forth our best effort to try to be as successful as possible.

I know students are feeling anxious. No one wants to perform poorly, whether it be for themselves, their parents or you.

And I know that you, too, are feeling anxious. You're worried about how testing will affect the self-confidence of your students. You're worried that the pride they've felt for knowing they've grown academically will go away when they realize the test is still hard compared to their ability and reading level. You're worried that you didn't do right by them because you see a poem on the test and you should've gone over poetry a little bit more to help them be successful.  You worry that really you should've assigned more reading homework or should've used even more lunch periods to hold math tutorials.  You worry that you didn't do something to set them up for success.

My message for you, Teach, is that you've been enough. We preach this to our students all year, but you must remember it too. The consistency you've provided your students all year, the hugs, the encouragement are all worth much, much more than a score on a test. You've held high standards for students despite many of them facing extreme adversity in their lives and have helped them grow from a "Below Basic" reader to damn near "Proficient". You've shown them how to have character and do the right thing even when no one is watching. You've modeled for them kindness, empathy, and honesty.

You've shown them that they are believed in, loved, trusted, listened to. You've shown them that they are important and that their voice matters. And while whatever will be, will be, when it comes to how they perform on their tests, you have done enough and you are enough.




p.s. Want to start a teacher blog like this one? My friend, Suzi, wrote an ebook that can help you get started and grow your blog!

Join the community!

Subscribe to get our latest content by email.


Powered by ConvertKit

How to Start a Teacher Blog



Hey, y'all!

I cannot believe it has been 1 whole year since I first started this blogging journey. I originally started this blog as a creative outlet, a way to share some tips I've learned along the way as a teacher, as well as share some awesome resources I've come across. If you asked me a year ago about where I'd think I'd be a year out from starting my blog, my answer would not have been anywhere near what has happened!

Blogging has not only been a creative outlet for me, or a side hobby, but it has connected me to other really passionate educators who are doing awesome things in their classrooms. I've been able to gain great ideas, network and learn about opportunities I never would have heard of if it wasn't for this inspiring community.  Because of all of this, the the purpose for this blog has changed a little bit for me, and has become even more clear in the past few weeks.

Lately, I've been lucky enough to start talking to others in my district about starting their own teaching blogs and sharing their voice. As a result of this,  everything I've tried (successful and not so successful) with blogging has come flooding back to me. I learned all about how to start my own blog through Googling (a LOT of Googling) and through just getting started and figuring it out as I went. I've loved this blogging community so much that now I want to share what I've learned!

When I first started, I literally Googled "How to Start a Teacher" blog for nothing to come up. I varied that search some and could only find links here and there where a teacher maybe wrote about something very specific in terms of customizing a blog, but there never was a "one-stop shop" place with advice. Yes, there are TONS of resources online (especially on Pinterest) about how to start a blog and market it, but the majority of the information is geared towards businesses who happen to blog. Let's face it, teachers and teaching blogs are just different! It has led to me wanting to be very intentional and specific in how I share everything I've learned!

Every teacher has a story, a unique point of view, and has something to offer to the larger education community. Whether you have some awesome strategies to share that can help out new (or all!) teachers, you want to market your Teachers Pay Teachers products or are just looking to start a project, you should start YOUR teacher blog!

To start off, I've created an overview infographic of "How to Start a Teacher Blog". If you want to grab it (it's FREE!) , sign up here and you will receive it to your email as soon as you confirm your email. I'm currently building much more content along these lines to build upon the info in this graphic and to go even more into specifics. Join Our Community!
Screen_shot_2017-04-06_at_4.49.23_pm
Join to receive the FREE resource: How to Start a Teacher Blog!






Also, my friend, Suzi, created an ebook about starting a blog that has helped me a lot as I've grown my blog. My ebook is not finished yet, so you should grab hers here!

Questions? Reach out to me in the comments, or on social media! I'm current loving Instagram. :)








My Experience at an ECET2 Conference



Hey, y'all!

It's been a while since I've posted but I'm so excited about this that I had to make time to share!

Last weekend I attended an ECET2 conference, specifically #ECET2LOU (Louisville). ECET stands for Elevating and Celebrating Effective Teaching and Teachers and was born "out of a desire to provide a forum for exceptional teachers to learn from one another and to celebrate the teaching profession".  It is connected with Teacher2Teacher on a national level and was organized in Louisville by JCPSForward, a group that is leading a "strategic, intentional effort to identify and connect the educators in JCPS that are deeply impacting learning and teaching". 

I left the conference feeling inspired, energized and fired up to return to my classroom. Being around other teachers who are life long learners that want to continuously increase their effectiveness and share was a breath of fresh air during this trying time in the year. Leaving the conference, it was so apparent how many amazing, mission-oriented educators are in my district and it was awesome meeting them face-to-face.

If you have the opportunity to attend one in your area, or even go to the national ECET2 (which I'd like to do), I'm highly recommending you take advantage of it and GO!

The Format/Style
Going to the conference, I wasn't really sure what to expect. What would the vibe be like? Would it be "sit and get" and a waste of a Saturday? Since it is FOR TEACHERS BY TEACHERS (#praise!), it wasn't "sit and get" at all! Friday night was the "optional" night and it opened with a keynote speaker (@drvickip) who was phenomenal. She spoke about how #ItsTime teachers are given voice, space and time to do their best work.

After the keynote, there were breakout sessions. Attendees could go watch a screening of "Most Likely to Succeed" or participate in BreakoutEDU games before heading to a more social gathering to end the night.

Bright and early the next morning, the conference started off with breakfast where attendees could register for the day as well as mingle with others. The rest of the day was divided up by breakout sessions (3), a "working lunch" with a speaker, and colleague circles. One of the best parts about the day was the variety of sessions you could choose from. Just how we, educators, talk about giving kids choice in the classroom and with assignments, it is the same with adults! I was able to make meaning of things and takeaway much more because I was in sessions that I chose that were relevant to me.

#WhyITeach: To Close Achievement Gaps


My Takeaways
The first session I chose was the ESSA/Ed Policy session. I was originally a political science major and have a passion for politics, especially ed policy. Because of the state of Kentucky politics at the moment, many education bills are being discussed this session. I wanted to hear what the presenters had to say, and learn from presenters who were committed to sharing information about the bills, without partisan spin and editorializing. My takeaway from this session was that a lot more educators are plugged in to these topics than I originally thought. Some awesome discussion came out of the session as we broke to talk about specific bills that are on the docket in the Kentucky legislature now. The conversations pushed my thinking, as well as confirmed some of my viewpoints. I also learned a lot more about the history of testing in Kentucky, as I was in elementary school with the CATS test started and wasn't privy to anything that happened outside of the playground. :)

The second session I chose was the Strengths and Girls of Color session presented by  Dr. Mathies, Dr. Carmichael and Dr. Young. This was the most powerful session. Not only were the presenters engaging, their statistics about discipline and suspension rates for girls of color were extremely relevant as they spoke about national trends, as well as within JCPS. Their session led participants to recognize and name some of their own privilege and bias in order to put some of their presentation into better context. They left the presenters with actionable steps and resources they can take back to their campuses. My takeaway from this session is that I'm not doing enough in order to push the thinking of my colleagues in terms of how we interact with girls of color at my campus. It is great if I am aware of myself, adjust my practice in order to better support students of color, but the work must not stop there.


My Next Steps
After reflecting this week on my takeaways and what "stuck with me", I wanted to create some next steps for myself because the exciting work and dialogue doesn't need to stop just because the conference is over!

Because of my passion for education policy, I'm going to be more plugged in in terms of monitoring education bills in my state and I'm going to provide feedback on bills through the KYEdPolicy website. The site allows visitors to read the bills as they are (with no partisan spin), leave feedback on a simple Google form, that then gets shared with electeds and other stakeholders. Conversations are going to be had about the legislation anyway, and I believe it is important to have as much feedback from educators as possible in the conversation.

Additionally, my next step is to to get more plugged in with the #ColorBraveJCPS work and to take steps to spread the word and challenge thinking on my campus in terms of how we support girls of color. I'm going to do this by (1) seeing if we can do the color arc activity with staff at my campus, as well as (2) have conversations about some of our school level data. I'm going to continue to dialogue with the presenters of the session (Dr. Mathies, Dr. Carmichael and Dr. Young) as well.

Have you attended an ECET2 conference? What was your experience like?


Until next time,

Join the community!

Subscribe to get our latest content by email.

Powered by ConvertKit
Back to Top